Nike: a social justice company? A case study

Written by John (the other John).


Nike has made the corporate decision of becoming an inner city company by choosing to side with an America-hating footballer who kneels during the national anthem in lieu of supporting America, the flag, and the Police. Nike’s decision was made in part that a huge part of its consumers are from the inner city who are more willing to be loyal to a product AND more quickly to boycott a product (unlike American patriots who are less willing to publicly boycott out of fear of being labelled “racist”). Thus Nike focuses its marketing to the inner city, hires poc’s (people of color) for its ads, for sales positions, and for executive positions. So by doing this, the face of Nike is poc’s. But is this a fraud?

The real salary for the average person is not in making a sales commission or that of an executive, but instead it is in production. First, the labour required and the money to be made from building the factory. Second, the labour involved in producing (assembling/manufacturing) the product. Nike mostly manufactures its products in China, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Thailand; this is accomplished in over 785 factories, employing over 1 million workers.

So let us examine this one variable at a time. First, as to the construction of the factories, the workers who were hired to build them were no doubt local labour. A tremendous amount of work would have been involved to build these factories, so much profits were earned by foreign construction companies. So the question is, why did not a “woke” company like Nike build these factories in the American inner cities so they could hire poc construction companies who hire poc workers? Which leads to the second point if the factories were built in the U.S. inner cities, a “woke” company like Nike would then hire poc’s in the U.S. to manufacture their products. Imagine 1 million U.S. workers having jobs producing Nike products at hundreds of factory sites in the inner cities? (Or if they hate America so much, then build the factories in Central America, so their economies would improve, and their citizens would not feel the need to pay smugglers to be trafficked into the U.S.). (Let us also ignore that Nike is known for its “sweatshop labor”-like factories, often using child labour; but things like this are overlooked when you have a “get out of jail card” by being “woke”).

The reality is, Nike does not care for poc’s; just profits. Nike wants to sell to poc’s, but not hire poc’s where the real money exists. Sales commission, executive salaries, and athletes in ads are nice, but the real money is in production and construction.

Social Justice? No! Social Just Us.

Nike: a social justice company? A case study Nike: a social justice company? A case study Reviewed by PostDiscus on September 27, 2019 Rating: 5

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